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'pediatric' posts

Free Class on Nutrition for Young Athletes to be Held at Swedish/Issaquah Feb. 20

ISSAQUAH, WA, Jan. 23, 2013 - With spring sports starting, don't drop the ball on nutrition. Nutrition is just as important as physical conditioning for athletes. So, as spring sports begin, let Swedish help you and your children prepare to hit it out of the park. Join Registered Dietitian Ally Colson for an interactive training on game-winning meals and snacks and help your young athlete become a nutrition champion.

Increasing Your Child’s Comfort with Nitrous Oxide

You may be familiar with “laughing gas” as something you find at the dentist’s office but did you know it can also be used when your child is a patient at Swedish? Laughing gas is a mix of nitrous oxide and oxygen, but you might hear your pediatric nurses just call it “nitrous.” In pediatrics, we use it to help a patient relax and feel more comfortable during certain procedures such as IV placement or urinary catheterization.

Once your doctor or nurse has determined that your child is a good candidate for nitrous (without any contraindications such as conditions where air may be trapped in the body, pregnancy, or impaired level of consciousness), your nurses and certified child life specialist (CCLS) will explain the process: Your child will choose a flavor for the inside of their mask used to administer the gas. They will be on a stretcher or bed and have a saturation probe attached to a finger to monitor their oxygenation. One nurse will administer oxygen, then the nitrous, gradually increasing the amount until your child is suitably relaxed for the procedure, while remaining responsive to directions. Another clinician will perform the procedure, e.g., place the IV. A doctor is also available.

As a parent ...

Introducing solids to your infant

As your baby grows, you’ve probably started wondering when and how to start feeding your infant solid foods. Here are some general tips to consider:

Is there a safe age to start feeding solid foods to my infant?

Yes, most infants this is between four and six months of age.

Why is there a ‘safe’ age to start feeding solids?

There are a few reasons why this age is safest. The first reason is because prior to four months of age, an infant is not developmentally ready to safely eat from a spoon.

To be able to swallow solids safely, an infant needs good head control; to be able to sit well with support; and to have lost the “extrusion reflex” (the reflex which enables newborns to tightly latch and suck from a nipple, but makes them shove a spoon out of their mouth).

The second reason an infant should be fed solids between four and six months is something many families are not aware of: it is also a strategy to prevent common food allergies. This is one of the strongest reasons I passionately advocate for infants to be exposed to as many foods as possible during this crucial three-month window.

Starting solids and preventing food allergies:

In the past, healthcare providers have advised parents to avoid potential allergens such as peanuts, eggs, and milk. New evidence is now showing that this practice might have played a role in the increased incidence of childhood food allergies in the U.S

Why might this occur? The ...

Swedish Pediatrics to Host Annual Holidays at The Hospital Community Event Dec. 2

SEATTLE, Nov. 20, 2012 - Swedish Pediatrics is hosting its third-annual Holidays at The Hospital event for their patients, families, friends and the community at large. This free and festive holiday celebration will be held Sunday, Dec. 2 from 1-4 p.m. in the 1101 Madison Medical Tower lobby on the Swedish/First Hill campus in Seattle.

Neck lumps in children: focus on the thyroid

There are a wide variety of nodules or lumps of the neck. We often group these growths by their location. While many lumps are simply lymph nodes, which come and go, growths near the “Adam’s apple” merit special attention. Lumps in the front/center of the neck are most likely related to the thyroid gland.

The thyroid gland produces thyroid hormone ,which is a chemical that influences a wide range of the body’s functions such as digestion, heart rate, mood, appetite, temperature, and growth. Younger children tend to have a congenital remnant called a thyroglossal duct cyst. During fetal development, the thyroid gland originates from the base of the tongue and then descends down the front of the neck to its eventual home just below the “Adam’s apple.” These cysts often get infected because they maintain a connection to the throat allowing bacteria to enter. If infected, we treat these initially with antibiotics and then perform a surgery to remove the cyst and its connection. The procedure is typically performed as a day surgery.

Actual thyroid nodules are increasing in number with an estimate around 1% of children developing an abnormal thyroid growth. These can vary from not at all threatening to cancerous (malignant). Firm, solid nodules that grow over time tend to be more concerning; but regardless of how they feel, these lumps should be evaluated by your physician. Sometimes the nodules cause an overactive thyroid gland which can lead to symptoms such as: feeling warmer than others, rapid or irregular pulse, anxiety/nervousness, insomnia, tremor, weight loss. Other times the nodule due to its size may cause symptoms such as pain, hoarse voice, difficulty swallowing.

Evaluation of these nodules includes ...

Hernias: why are some watched while others are repaired?

The most common thing that I see as a pediatric surgeon is a child with a lump that is thought to be a hernia. A hernia is a bulging of tissue through an opening in the muscle layers that isn’t normally present. In children, these openings are usually the result of a developmental process that just didn’t quite reach completion. Some hernias need surgery emergently, while others are observed for years with the expectation that they will close on their own.

Here are some pointers to help understand this wide range of approaches to hernias:

Location is very important in considering how aggressive to be with hernias. Belly button (umbilical) hernias are...

Constipation during infancy

As a pediatric surgeon with a special interest in intestinal issues, I am often contacted by worried parents regarding their baby's infrequent bowel movements. This can be caused by a variety of
problems such as blockages of the intestines or abnormal intestinal function (including a condition called Hirschsprung's disease); but most frequently babies are just efficiently absorbing and thus not needing to poop very often. This is especially true for breastfed babies. So, how can a parent tell the difference?

I would offer the following "red flags" as issues that may indicate a problem needing further medical evaluation:

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