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'Neuroscience Institute' posts

Study Makes Waves in Treating Essential Tremor

The treatment of neurologic disease took a major step forward this past week with the publication of a clinical trial that used ultrasound waves to treat Essential Tremor.  Essential tremor affects about 10 million people in the USA and can be extremely disabling. For patients that fail medical therapy invasive surgical options are considered, including deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS surgeries involve drilling a hole in the skull and implanting an electrode into structures deep in the brain to turn off the unwanted signals that cause the tremor.

A study of 15 patients lead by Dr. Jeff Elias (University of Virginia) was published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week and describes how researchers used ultrasound waves to effectively treat Essential tremor non-invasively – no cutting or drilling:

 

Swedish Medical Center Welcomes Dr. Charles Cobbs

SEATTLE — Aug. 15, 2013 — Swedish, the largest nonprofit healthcare provider in the greater Seattle area, announced today that Dr. Charles S. Cobbs will lead The Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (Ivy Center) at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute as its new director. The Ivy Center was founded on a mission to combine research science with medical treatments to advance the field of brain cancer and to give new hope to each person diagnosed with the disease.

Dr. Cobbs is a neurosurgeon and internationally recognized expert in brain cancer treatment and research. He was personally selected for this role by Dr. Greg Foltz, the inaugural director and founder of the Ivy Center, who passed away on June 27, 2013 from pancreatic cancer.

The anti-inflammatory diet and multiple sclerosis

We have all seen inflammation on the surface of our bodies. Redness, heat, swelling or pain after a cut or sprain are examples of this process at work. In these cases, inflammation benefits the body by bringing more nutrients and immune activity to the injured or infected area, helping it to heal.

When inflammation occurs without purpose or is persistent, it can cause damage and illness. This type of abnormal inflammation is the root of many chronic diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS).

Many factors contribute to chronic inflammation including stress, exposure to toxins such as cigarette smoke and dietary choices. We have control over some of the causes of inflammation. Learning what foods have an anti-inflammatory effect on the body may be beneficial in reducing long-term disease risk.

The anti-inflammatory diet is a balanced, sensible way of eating. It not only influences inflammation but also provides your body with adequate energy, vitamins, minerals, healthy fats and fiber. Here are a few recommendations for eating to reduce and prevent inflammation:

MS Research Roundup: Cannabinoids and new trials for progressive MS

A couple recent announcements may be of interest to people living with multiple sclerosis. Read the articles below and click through the links for more information about the individual studies.

Trial shows no benefit of cannabinoid in slowing multiple sclerosis progression

A UK trial of dronabinol (delta-9-THC) in 498 patients did not slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to placebo. Critics will point out that this is only one of many cannabinoids found in marijuana; and that the placebo arm did better than expected (thus limiting the ability to detect the effects of the drug). Nonetheless, the result is the strongest argument yet against the neuroprotective effects of THC in MS population.

New trials in progressive MS are coming

Later this year, two trials will ...

Bike the US for MS riders donate $25,000 to the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

The Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish welcomed 30 cyclists Sunday for the finale of their coast-to-coast ride for multiple sclerosis (MS). Cyclists and a crowd of supporters and loved ones continued the celebration inside where they presented the Swedish MS Center with a $25,000 donation.

The ride was extremely significant for one of the cyclists, Diane Mattens, who is also a patient at the Swedish MS Center. Diane has been living with multiple sclerosis for nearly three decades and is the first woman with MS to complete a Bike the US for MS tour.

Diane credits Dr. James Bowen, who has been her doctor for the past 15 years, saying he "knows me all too well." In addition to raising more than $15,000 for her ride, Diane’s goal is to help change the face of MS and inspire other people living with the disease to keep moving.

“I think just knowing the fact that I can [complete the ride] is pretty motivating in itself,” Diane told KING-5 News. “You can’t waste one day because you never know what’s going to happen tomorrow.”

We are extremely grateful for ...

Can Botox help paraspinal muscle spasticity in multiple sclerosis?

This post is jointly written with Alika Ziker, Swedish Neuroscience Institute research intern.

Botulinum toxin type-A (Botox) is a naturally occurring toxic substance best known for its use in cosmetics.  It is taken from certain bacteria and works by preventing the target muscle from contracting.

Over the last 15 years, several studies have emerged supporting the idea that Botox is also an effective and safe therapy for people who suffer from a loss of muscle control, lower back pain and even migraines. Because multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that attacks the central nervous system, many MS patients suffer from those same conditions, as well as weakness and spasticity.  Depending on the individual, the affected muscles may be ....

Easy make-ahead meals to beat MS fatigue

In my last post about eating well with multiple sclerosis (MS), we discussed meal planning and prep to help enable you to eat nutritiously through the week.

Maybe you’ve decided to carve out some time to make a list and prep some food for the week. Good for you! Need some inspiration?

Here are a few recipes that will produce left overs that hold up well and can be packed up for healthy lunches. Don’t forget to include plenty of extra fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grain cereals and non-fat dairy products to be eaten as breakfast and snacks.

Meal 1: Chilled peanut noodles with grilled chicken breast and steamed broccoli

Click here for the recipe.

The whole-wheat noodles give you a good dose of fiber to help keep you regular and the protein from the peanuts will help you feel full longer than other vegetarian pasta dishes. Cook enough chicken for you and your family to have a 4 oz. portion both for dinner lunch the next day, plus an extra pound for another recipe later in the week.

This noodle dish can be served room temperature right after it is made. It is also great eaten cold the next day. If you are sensitive to heat and don’t want to heat up you kitchen re-heating food then you will love this dish.

Meal 2: Slow-cooker vegetarian chili with a whole grain roll

Click here for the recipe.

This dish is ...

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