Astrid Morris
Astrid D. Morris, M.D.

Astrid D. Morris, M.D.

Astrid D. Morris, M.D.
Specialty

Oncology - Radiation

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Breast Cancer

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, American Express, Discover Card, Money Order

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

““Dr. Morris was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2012)

Nearly 4,500 physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Medical School

University of Saarland Medical School, Germany

Residency

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Board Certifications

Radiation Oncology

Additional Information:

““Dr. Morris was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2012)

Nearly 4,500 physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

What should I know about radiation if I have breast cancer?

If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, you may wonder if radiation is an option for you.

Radiation is an important pillar of treatment for breast cancer and has never been safer when designed by an experienced team with state of the art technology. Radiation will be part of a standard treatment plan after breast conserving surgery (also called lumpectomy or partial mastectomy). With the addition of radiation to the breast as an insurance policy, patients will do just as well as those undergoing mastectomy. Even after a mastectomy there are indications when radiation to the chest wall and nodes are recommended for best outcome. After a lumpectomy, radiation to the whole breast is the current gold standard.

How does radiation actually work?

Radiation works by aiming it at a target. Free radicals are produced which kill cancer cells, while normal cells have the capability to repair the damage. Cancer cells don’t.

Having the most advanced technology available to precisely plan and deliver radiation to the target will protect healthy tissue for optimal outcomes and the best possible cosmetic result.

How can I make sure I receive the best radiation?

The radiation oncologists treating you should be part of an interdisciplinary team. I, for example, work closely with the patient, the breast surgeons and the medical oncologists. I then design a personalized radiation plan, tailored to the unique characteristics of the tumor and each patient’s personal preferences. The more personalized the treatment the better.

To allow patients to feel their best during and after treatment, I often work with physical therapists, naturopaths, and other support staff (social worker, dietitian etc).

What type of radiation treatment do I need?

Radiation options after a breast conserving surgery can be very confusing. Here is a list that may help you understand the different options:

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Offices

Radiation Oncology / First Hill - Swedish Cancer Institute
1221 Madison Street
Arnold Pavilion, 1st Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-386-2323
Fax: 206-215-6150
Office Hours: Monday-Friday. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m

Map & Directions

Swedish Cancer Institute / Issaquah
751 N.E. Blakely Dr.
Suite 1090
Issaquah, WA 98029
Phone: 425-313-4200
Fax: 425-313-4201
Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Map & Directions

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